Anchored Hearts
gydja:

Iboriis, 10th Century Post Imperium: This is the bag carried by the Keeper of the dead, in which he keeps his relics - the ritual objects of his trade; the inscribed future-telling bones; and the special Talisman, to protect himself and his subjects from malevolents spirits. He casts the bones in regular protection and divination ceremonies, and is saught after secretly by people who want to find out the spiritual state of their loved-ones. Some think he can predict the future with unfailing accuracy, though it takes great courage to seek him out personally for such a purpose. (via Bone Bag — Inga Hunter)

gydja:

Iboriis, 10th Century Post Imperium: This is the bag carried by the Keeper of the dead, in which he keeps his relics - the ritual objects of his trade; the inscribed future-telling bones; and the special Talisman, to protect himself and his subjects from malevolents spirits. He casts the bones in regular protection and divination ceremonies, and is saught after secretly by people who want to find out the spiritual state of their loved-ones. Some think he can predict the future with unfailing accuracy, though it takes great courage to seek him out personally for such a purpose. (via Bone Bag — Inga Hunter)

art-of-swords:

The Side Sword (Spada da Lato)
This weapon evolved from the arming sword of the knight. It took a relatively short period of time before it was worn by the military man and civilian alike. People often refer to this type of sword as a “Cut and Thrust” sword. This name is actually a misnomer. Almost all swords have the ability to cut and to thrust. Some swords are better at one or the other. A Rapier could therefore be called a “Thrust and Cut” sword. The Italians of the 16th century simply called this weapon a “Spada di Lato” or Edged Sword.
By the middle of the 15th century it was not unusual to encounter finer bladed side swords being utilised away from the battlefield when encountering an adversary. However the military man would have retained the broader hence stronger blade for use in warfare. At the start of this evolution they had very simple hilts with ring protection particularly for protecting the finger that passed over the quillons and around the ricasso.
The spada da lato or “side-sword” is the Italian term for the type of sword popular during the late 16th century, corresponding to the Spanish espada ropera. It is a continuation of the medieval arming sword and in turn the predecessor of the rapier of the Early Modern period. Its use was taught in the Dardi school of Italian fencing, influential on 17th century rapier fencing.
The Side Swords was ideal for handling the mix of armored and unarmored opponents of that time. A new technique of placing one’s finger on the ricasso to improve the grip (a practice that would continue in the rapier) led to the production of hilts with a guard for the finger. This sword design eventually led to the development of the civilian rapier, but it was not replaced by it, and the side-sword continued to be used during the rapier’s lifetime.
As the side sword developed the hilt protection grew to cover most of the hand and the swept hilt rapier emerged. Like all other developments of weaponry in history there was an overlap of many years and it would not be accurate to draw firm time lines between broad sword, side sword and the rapier for example. In Italy the side sword refers to any sword worn on the side and includes the later swept hilts and cup hilts as well.
Also of note is that as rapiers became more popular, attempts were made to hybridize the blade, sacrificing the effectiveness found in each unique weapon design. These are still considered side-swords and are sometimes labeled sword rapier or cutting rapier by modern collectors.

Info sources: Sussex Sword Academy | Wikipedia | Steaphen Fick 
Photo source: Steaphen Fick (Image: side sword from Museum Replicas, circa Mid 16th Century)

art-of-swords:

The Side Sword (Spada da Lato)

This weapon evolved from the arming sword of the knight. It took a relatively short period of time before it was worn by the military man and civilian alike. People often refer to this type of sword as a “Cut and Thrust” sword. This name is actually a misnomer. Almost all swords have the ability to cut and to thrust. Some swords are better at one or the other. A Rapier could therefore be called a “Thrust and Cut” sword. The Italians of the 16th century simply called this weapon a “Spada di Lato” or Edged Sword.

By the middle of the 15th century it was not unusual to encounter finer bladed side swords being utilised away from the battlefield when encountering an adversary. However the military man would have retained the broader hence stronger blade for use in warfare. At the start of this evolution they had very simple hilts with ring protection particularly for protecting the finger that passed over the quillons and around the ricasso.

The spada da lato or “side-sword” is the Italian term for the type of sword popular during the late 16th century, corresponding to the Spanish espada ropera. It is a continuation of the medieval arming sword and in turn the predecessor of the rapier of the Early Modern period. Its use was taught in the Dardi school of Italian fencing, influential on 17th century rapier fencing.

The Side Swords was ideal for handling the mix of armored and unarmored opponents of that time. A new technique of placing one’s finger on the ricasso to improve the grip (a practice that would continue in the rapier) led to the production of hilts with a guard for the finger. This sword design eventually led to the development of the civilian rapier, but it was not replaced by it, and the side-sword continued to be used during the rapier’s lifetime.

As the side sword developed the hilt protection grew to cover most of the hand and the swept hilt rapier emerged. Like all other developments of weaponry in history there was an overlap of many years and it would not be accurate to draw firm time lines between broad sword, side sword and the rapier for example. In Italy the side sword refers to any sword worn on the side and includes the later swept hilts and cup hilts as well.

Also of note is that as rapiers became more popular, attempts were made to hybridize the blade, sacrificing the effectiveness found in each unique weapon design. These are still considered side-swords and are sometimes labeled sword rapier or cutting rapier by modern collectors.

Info sources: Sussex Sword Academy | Wikipedia | Steaphen Fick 

Photo source: Steaphen Fick (Image: side sword from Museum Replicas, circa Mid 16th Century)

I should get occult power tattoos and carry fetishes with me at all times so that when I die a spectacular death people can wonder on my occult mission
art-of-swords:

Fight Book Detail
Ridolfo Capo Ferro, Gran Simulatero dell’arte e dell’uso della scherma, Siena, © the Howard de Walden Library.
The image depicts Capo Ferro’s idea on a lunge, a uniquely Italian attack. Many lines have been drawn to show porportion to give the student an idea of what a proper lunge should look like. His diagrams are true products of Renaissance artistry. The lunge was vital and unique to the Italian method.

Photo source: Wallace Collection 
Info source: Works of Richard Marsden


Circle theory, based on the idea of the lunge, is epic.

art-of-swords:

Fight Book Detail

  • Ridolfo Capo Ferro, Gran Simulatero dell’arte e dell’uso della scherma, Siena, © the Howard de Walden Library.

The image depicts Capo Ferro’s idea on a lunge, a uniquely Italian attack. Many lines have been drawn to show porportion to give the student an idea of what a proper lunge should look like. His diagrams are true products of Renaissance artistry. The lunge was vital and unique to the Italian method.

Photo source: Wallace Collection 

Info source: Works of Richard Marsden

Circle theory, based on the idea of the lunge, is epic.

GIVE A FUCK WHAT YOU HEARD

FUCK WHAT YOU HEARD
WHAT WHAT 

scarlett johansson for dolce and gabbana, the one

BE STILL MY HEART

ironbro:

victorian-gothic:

countessnoir:

coppertonepretty:

sourcedumal:

xerovision:

I WANT THEM

Dear future boyfriend: Wear these. Often.

defo could use these design for Errol >,>

I wanna draw men in these sexy vests :3

*squeee’s* OK I know my inner dandy is showing

fuck y’all these are all mine

Its official I am dying why dont I own theeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeese
 

Orchid - 36 Day Syndrome
881 plays

travels-:

Orchid - 36 Day Syndrome

And I wonder, do you still think of me?

hey, thank you so much for the follow! since i'm only just starting out, and my paranormal blog will rely on people's submissions, i'm being quite annoying (ignore me if you consider this rude or don't want to!) and asking for possible promotions - just to get me started. thanks so much and if not, im sorry! x

Will do! 
follow this creepy ass blog! 

When A Jealous Man Finds A Gun - Enter shikari